Sept 26 2017 1 Nephi 11 – 15 Lesson 4 by Rebekah Ellsworth

“God hath not revealed anything to Joseph, but what He will make known unto the Twelve, and even the least Saint may know all things as fast as he is able to bear them” – Joseph Smith, Jr., History of the Church, 3:380

“The Spirit made explicit that the Tree of Life and its precious fruit are symbols of Christ’s redemption” – Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Christ and the New Covenant: The Messianic Message of the Book of Mormon [1997], 160

“The tree of life . . . is the love of God (see 1 Nephi 11:25). The love of God for His children is most profoundly expressed in His gift of Jesus as our Redeemer: ‘God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son’ ( John 3:16). To partake of the love of God is to partake of Jesus’ Atonement and the emancipations and joys which it can bring”  – Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Conference Report, Oct. 1999, 6; or Ensign, Nov. 1999, 8

“Warring Against the Saints of God,” Stephen E. Robinson, Ensign, January 1988

April 4 2017 D&C Class 27 by Rebekah Ellsworth

Quotes:

“It was Joseph Smith who taught me how to prize the endearing relationships of father and mother, husband and wife; of brother and sister, son and daughter.

“It was from him that I learned that the wife of my bosom might be secured to me for time and all eternity; and that the refined sympathies and affections which endeared us to each other emanated from the fountain of divine eternal love. …

“I had loved before, but I knew not why. But now I loved—with a pureness—an intensity of elevated, exalted feeling, which would lift my soul from the transitory things of this grovelling sphere and expand it as the ocean. … In short, I could now love with the spirit and with the understanding also.

“Yet, at that time, my dearly beloved brother, Joseph Smith, had … merely lifted a corner of the veil and given me a single glance into eternity.” 

–Parley P. Pratt  (as cited in “Marriage is Essential to His Eternal Plan,” Elder David A. Bednar, Ensign, June 2006)

“The sense of the phrase ezer kenegdo is ‘an equal but opposite helper to him’. For example, my left hand is the ezer kenegdo to my right hand; both hands look alike except they are exactly opposite. Both hands are equal but opposite. This is so that they might work better together. Imagine trying to pick up a shovel with two hands that are positioned the same! Again, the ezer kenegdo of the right wing of an airplane is the left wing; they look exactly the same except they are opposite each other. Both wings are equal but opposite. This is so that the airplane can fly. One wing is no more important than the other. The same is true with man and woman. Man’s ezer kenegdo is woman. Both are equal but opposite. It requires both to fulfill the role of parenthood!”

Bruce Satterfield, “The Family Under Siege: The Role of Men and Women,” Ricks College Education Week Presentation, 7 June 2001